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The Top 4 Regrets In Retirement

The Top 4 Regrets In Retirement

| September 05, 2019
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What do you want to feel when you retire? A general sense of fulfillment from all your hard work? Excitement about finally reaching this pivotal milestone? Regret? That last one may not make your list, but unfortunately, 55% of retirees say that’s what they experienced. (1)

Thankfully, you can learn from the mistakes of others and make changes now so that your retirement isn’t riddled with regret. Here are four common retirement regrets to keep in mind as you prepare for your golden years.

1. Retiring Too Early (Or Too Late)

Whether you are forced to retire earlier than planned or you decide on your own, retiring before you are ready can cause plenty of regret. In fact, 30% of retirees admitted they would gladly re-enter the workforce if a job became available. (2)

If you decided to retire before turning 65, you probably had to find pre-Medicare coverage, which is often quite a bit more expensive than an employer-sponsored plan. By waiting until you turn 65, you will qualify for Medicare and not be forced to obtain other health insurance to cover you during the transition.

Financially, the earlier you retire, the fewer years you have to save and the longer you will have to live off of your money. If your finances are keeping you up at night or you are living at a lower quality of life than you are used to, you may regret retiring when you did.

Working even a few years longer can provide these valuable benefits: 

  • More time to accumulate savings
  • More years to apply toward Social Security, which could result in a larger benefit amount
  • Health insurance coverage through your employer
  • Purpose and identity
  • Stronger mental and physical health (3)

On the other hand, another common regret is waiting too long to retire. If you have enough money saved and you and your financial advisor have planned for every aspect of your golden years, you should consider retiring as soon as possible. The younger you are when you retire, the more energy and health you’ll have to enjoy retirement. Many retirees regret spending their best retirement years grinding away at work. Sure, they had more money when they finally did retire, but they had less time to enjoy it. The point is this: your situation is unique. Be sure to take a good hard look at your financial situation to ensure your money will last, and don’t let your retirement fears hold you back.  

2. Retiring With Debt

When you retire and are living on a fixed income, you want all your financial resources to go towards your expenses. Carrying debt into retirement can eat away at your precious savings and force you to be much tighter with your budget than you’d like to be. 

Make a strategic plan to simultaneously eliminate your debt while still saving for retirement. Review all current debts you face and compare interest rates and balances. This can help you decide which to pay off first. Once you’ve eliminated credit card and auto debt, see how you can aggressively pay off your mortgage. Being mortgage-free could reduce your monthly expenses by up to a third and make a significant impact on how you spend your savings.

3. Underestimating Risk

You might think that if you just save as much as possible, you’ll be fine. But there are a handful of factors that could devastate your hard-earned nest egg, like inflation, what the markets are doing when you retire, how long you live, or unexpected healthcare expenses. You might not be able to plan for every contingency out there, but you can stress-test your finances to see how they will hold up to any or all of these risks, then map out a strategy for how to protect yourself and your money. 

4. Not Setting Retirement Goals

Free time is a major perk of retirement, but when you go from working full-time to not working at all, it can be a shock to your system. Saying goodbye to your career, your colleagues, and your routines can cause anxiety and depression. But if you plan ahead to fill your time with activities that will fulfill you, you can avoid the negative emotions that can come with this life transition. 

Do you want to know what activities result in a fulfilling retirement? A BMO study on retirement planning reveals that retirees who stayed busy and active, pursued independence, and volunteered their time were satisfied with their life. (4) One study of retirees even found that those who volunteered 200 hours a year were less likely to develop high blood pressure. (5) The takeaway here is to be intentional about your time in retirement. Make a list of things you want to do, places you want to go, and people you want to spend time with, then strategically map out the details so your goals become a reality. It’s easy to lose your identity when you say goodbye to your career, but filling your time and venturing out into new territory will help you build a new identity and give you something to look forward to.

Retire With No Regrets

No matter what your situation, it’s possible to enjoy your retirement without regretting the decisions you made. At Sirius Wealth Management, we understand that deciding when and how to retire is a difficult decision, but we want you to know that you don’t have to make the hard choices on your own. Our top priority is to help you achieve financial stability and give you the confidence to work toward financial independence. If you want to have a regret-free retirement, call 636-449-4890 or email david.domian@lpl.com to schedule an appointment.

About David

David has been working in the financial services industry since 1980 and specializes in financial planning with a focus on retirement planning. His planning concentrates on four specific goals:  the accumulation of wealth, the reduction of taxes and volatility in retirement, the necessary strategies to deal with the risks of longevity, and the passing of an estate in a private, tax-efficient, and protected manner. David holds designations as a CFP® CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, ChFC® Chartered Financial Consultant, CLU® Chartered Life Underwriter, and AEP® Accredited Estate Planner®.

David has been married to his wife, Sue, for over 41 years, and together they have four children and eight grandchildren. Dave is a big believer in family and still has family dinners almost every Sunday with most of his kids, grandchildren, and even his 97-year-old mother. Dave and Sue have lived in St. Louis all their lives. He enjoys spending time outdoors, especially fishing with his grandchildren; he knows they will only be young for so long and you have to live in the moment. This year will be Dave’s 18th annual cross-country motorcycle trip with three college friends; together they have traveled through over 40 states on these memorable road trips. 

Dave and Sue support many charitable organizations, including the MS-Society, Cystic Fibrosis, the Lupus Foundation, St. Louis Men’s Group Against Cancer, and the Mary Culver Home for vision-impaired women, where his mother lives. Their support comes in an unusual way: Dave and Sue donate a BBQ (including a pig roast, cooked, carved, and served on site), which is auctioned off at one of their live events. This popular auction item is a great way for Dave and Sue to have fun and do some good in the community. Dave also serves as a board member on the Estate Planning Council of St. Louis.

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(1) https://www.globalatlantic.com/retirement-survey

(2) https://www.cnbc.com/2014/08/21/retirees-go-back-to-work.html

(3) http://www.medicaldaily.com/planning-retiring-early-consider-these-5-health-risks-first-247669

(4) https://commercial.bmoharris.com/resource/wealth-management/whats-your-retirement-game-plan/

(5) http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/pag/28/2/578/?_ga=1.177767717.1281536077.1488342343

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